nigerianostalgia:

Ibibio man his and wife. Ikot-Ekpene. March 7th 1905.

nigerianostalgia:

Ibibio man his and wife. Ikot-Ekpene. March 7th 1905.

nigerianostalgia:

Photo taken in Southern Nigeria during The Aro Punitive Expedition 1901. The Anglo–Aro War (1901–1902) was a conflict between the Aro Confederacy in present day Eastern Nigeria, and the British Empire. The war began after increasing tension between Aro leaders and British colonialists after years of failed negotiations.

nigerianostalgia:

Photo taken in Southern Nigeria during The Aro Punitive Expedition 1901.
The Anglo–Aro War (1901–1902) was a conflict between the Aro Confederacy in present day Eastern Nigeria, and the British Empire. The war began after increasing tension between Aro leaders and British colonialists after years of failed negotiations.

nigerianostalgia:

Photo showing four young girls carrying pots on their head, Kano 1950sVintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Photo showing four young girls carrying pots on their head, Kano 1950s
Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Traffic in the streets of Lagos, commonly known  as ‘go slows’. 1982.Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Traffic in the streets of Lagos, commonly known  as ‘go slows’. 1982.
Vintage Nigeria

Nigeria - The Slave Trade

nigerianostalgia:

By 1471 Portuguese ships had reconnoitered the West African coast south as far as the Niger Delta, although they did not know that it was the delta, and in 1481 emissaries from the king of Portugal visited the court of the oba of Benin. For a time, Portugal and Benin maintained close relations. Portuguese soldiers aided Benin in its wars; Portuguese even came to be spoken at the oba's court. Gwatto, the port of Benin, became the depot to handle the peppers, ivory, and increasing numbers of slaves offered by the oba in exchange for coral beads; textile imports from India; European-manufactured articles, including tools and weapons; and manillas (brass and bronze bracelets that were used as currency and also were melted down for objets d’art). Portugal also may have been the first European power to import cowrie shells, which were the currency of the far interior.

Benin profited from its close ties with the Portuguese and exploited the firearms bought from them to tighten its hold on the lower Niger area. Two factors checked the spread of Portuguese influence and the continued expansion of Benin, however. First, Portugal stopped buying pepper because of the availability of other spices in the Indian Ocean region. Second, Benin placed an embargo on the export of slaves, thereby isolating itself from the growth of what was to become the major export from the Nigerian coast for 300 years. Benin continued to capture slaves and to employ them in its domestic economy, but the Edo state remained unique among Nigerian polities in refusing to participate in the transatlantic trade. In the long run, Benin remained relatively isolated from the major changes along the Nigerian coast.

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Fela Kuti, live in 1978

anotherafrica:

Shades of Swagger #51 | From a Nigerian great, Studio portraiture by J.D. Okhai Ojeikere ca 1968

anotherafrica:

Shades of Swagger #51 | From a Nigerian great, Studio portraiture by J.D. Okhai Ojeikere ca 1968

nigerianostalgia:

An unidentified Yoruba ruler with his people in 1898.

nigerianostalgia:

An unidentified Yoruba ruler with his people in 1898.

nigerianostalgia:

Herd of goats in Ibadan, Nigeria. (1971)Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Herd of goats in Ibadan, Nigeria. (1971)
Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

"City of Nsukka. Troops of the Federal government entering the university of Nsukka (one of Africa’s largest university). 1970s
Vintage Nigeria

yagazieemezi:

 
nigerianostalgia:

A wounded soldier being attended to by an Igbo medic. Biafra Nigeria 1968Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

A wounded soldier being attended to by an Igbo medic. Biafra Nigeria 1968
Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

An unidentified Queen of Old Calabar 1907. Publisher UnknownVintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

An unidentified Queen of Old Calabar 1907. Publisher Unknown
Vintage Nigeria

Ethnicity in Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Ethnicity is one of the keys to understanding Nigeria’s pluralistic society. It distinguishes groupings of peoples who for historical reasons have come to be seen as distinctive—by themselves and others—on the basis of locational origins and a series of other cultural markers. Experience in the postindependence period fostered a widespread belief that modern ethnicity affects members’ life chances. In Nigerian colloquial usage, these collectivities were commonly called “tribes.” In the emergent Nigerian national culture, this topic was discussed widely as “tribalism,” a morally reprehensible term whose connotations were similar to American terms, such as “discrimination,” “racism,” or “prejudice.” Nigerian national policies have usually fostered tolerance and appreciation for cultural differences, while trying at the same time to suppress unfair treatment based on ethnic prejudice. This long-term campaign involved widespread support in educated circles to replace the term “tribe” or “tribal” with the more universally applicable concept of ethnicity. Nevertheless, older beliefs died slowly, and ethnic identities were still a vital part of national life in 1990.

The ethnic variety was dazzling and confusing. Estimates of the number of distinct ethnic groupings varied from 250 to as many as 400. The most widely used marker was that of language. In most cases, people who spoke a distinct language having a separate term for the language and/or its speakers saw themselves, or were viewed by others, as ethnically different. Language groupings were numbered in the 1970s at nearly 400, depending upon disagreements over whether or not closely related languages were mutually intelligible. Language groupings sometimes shifted their distinctiveness rather than displaying clear boundaries. Manga and Kanuri speakers in northeastern Nigeria spoke easily to one another. But in the major Kanuri city of Maiduguri, 160 kilometers south of Manga-speaking areas, Manga was considered a separate language. Kanuri and Manga who lived near each other saw themselves as members of the same ethnic group; others farther away did not.

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