nigerianostalgia:

Yorùbá Bàtá: A living drum and dance tradition from Nigeria.

nigerianostalgia:

A veteran of the Biafra War showing his medals. 1982.Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

A veteran of the Biafra War showing his medals. 1982.
Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Northern Nigerian hunters. 1956Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Northern Nigerian hunters. 1956
Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Anti-cholera vaccination in a village, near Enugu. 1971.Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Anti-cholera vaccination in a village, near Enugu. 1971.
Vintage Nigeria

Indigenous Beliefs

nigerianostalgia:

Alongside most Nigerian religious adherence were systems of belief with ancient roots in the area. These beliefs combined family ghosts with relations to the primordial spirits of a particular site. In effect the rights of a group defined by common genealogical descent were linked to a particular place and the settlements within it. The primary function of such beliefs was to provide supernatural sanctions and legitimacy to the relationship between, and the regulations governing, claims on resources, especially agricultural land and house sites. Access rights to resources, political offices, economic activities, or social relations were defined and legitimized by these same religious beliefs.

 The theology expressing and protecting these relationships centered, first, on the souls of the recently dead, ghosts who continued their interest in the living as they had when they were alive. That is to say, authoritative elders demanded conformity to rules governing access to, and inheritance of, rights to resources. Indigenous theology also comprised all of the duties of the living to one another and to their customs, including their obligations to the dead ancestors whose spirits demanded adherence to the moral rules governing all human actions. The second pantheon were the supernatural residents of the land. These spirits of place (trees, rock outcroppings, a river, snakes, or other animals and objects) were discovered and placated by the original founders, who had migrated to the new site from a previous one. Spirits of the land might vary with each place or be so closely identified with a group’s welfare that they were carried to a new place as part of the continuity of a group to its former home. In the new place, these spiritual migrants joined the local spirit population. Such deities developed from an original covenant created by the founders of a settlement between themselves and the local spirits. This covenant legitimized their arrival. In return for regular rites and prayers to these spirits, the founders could claim perpetual access to local resources. In doing so, they became the lineage in charge of the hereditary local priesthood and village headship and were recognized as “owners of the place” by later human arrivals. Both sets of spirits, those of family and those of place, demanded loyalty to communal virtues and to the authority of the elders in defending ancient beliefs and practices.

Read More

nigerianostalgia:

C.M.S. Cathedral, Ibadan, May 1966. Source: Smithsonian InstitutionVintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

C.M.S. Cathedral, Ibadan, May 1966. Source: Smithsonian Institution
Vintage Nigeria

yagazieemezi:

Location: Agukwu Nri, Nri, Alaigbo | Date: ?Unsure?, Before 1921 | Credit: Thomas.

yagazieemezi:

Location: Agukwu Nri, Nri, Alaigbo | Date: ?Unsure?, Before 1921 | Credit: Thomas.

nigerianostalgia:

Roadside market scene, Lagos 1975.Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Roadside market scene, Lagos 1975.
Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Hundreds of fishermen participating to the annual fishing festival at a river in Argungu, Kebbi state. 1980sVintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Hundreds of fishermen participating to the annual fishing festival at a river in Argungu, Kebbi state. 1980s
Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Women and children eating during a ceremony for a newborn child, Mgbom Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria. 1950sVintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Women and children eating during a ceremony for a newborn child, Mgbom Village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria. 1950s
Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

 A worker in the Gulf oil rig. Warri, 1980sVintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

 A worker in the Gulf oil rig. Warri, 1980s
Vintage Nigeria

ukpuru:

Igbo vocal group with leader and percussion, recorded by Northcote Thomas at Umucuku, Nigeria on 23rd April 1911.

[From the instruments and pattern, I believe this came from the Arochukwu area of the Igbo speaking region (besides the fact that it would be Arochukwu people who usually used ‘Chukwu’). The vocals has a curious resemblance to recordings made in the old south of the United States around the same time.].

yagazieemezi:

1977
afrikanwomen:

African women making change
Margaret Ekpo, Activist, Feminist
Country: Nigeria
Margaret Ekpo (1914-2006) was a Nigerian women’s rights activist and social mobilizer who was a pioneering female politician in the country’s First Republic and was a leading member of a class of traditional Nigerian women activists, many of whom rallied women beyond notions of ethnic solidarity. She played major roles as a grassroot and nationalist politician in the Eastern Nigerian city of Aba, in the era of an hierarchical and male dominated movement towards independence, with her rise not the least helped by the socialization of women’s role into that of helpmates or appendages to the careers of males. 
Margaret Ekpo’s awareness of growing movements for civil rights for women around the world prodded her into demanding the same for the women in her country and to fight the discriminatory and oppressive political and civil role colonialism played in the subjugation of women. She felt that women abroad including those in Britain, were already fighting for civil rights and had more voice in political and civil matters than their counterparts in Nigeria. She later joined the decolonization leading National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons, as a platform to represent a marginalized group. In 1953, she was nominated by the N.C.N.C. to the regional House of Chiefs and in 1954, she established the Aba Township Women’s Association. As leader of the new market group, she was able to garner the trust of a large amount of women in the township and turn it into a political pressure group. By 1955, women in Aba had outnumbered men voters in a city wide election.
She won a seat into the Eastern Regional House of Assembly in 1961. A position that allowed her to fight for issues affecting women at the time. In particular, were issues on the progress of women in economic and political matters, especially in the areas of transportation around major roads leading to markets and rural transportation in general. 
After a military coup ended the First Republic, she took a less prominent approach to politics. In 2001, the Calabar Airport was named after her.

afrikanwomen:

African women making change

Margaret Ekpo, Activist, Feminist

Country: Nigeria

Margaret Ekpo (1914-2006) was a Nigerian women’s rights activist and social mobilizer who was a pioneering female politician in the country’s First Republic and was a leading member of a class of traditional Nigerian women activists, many of whom rallied women beyond notions of ethnic solidarity. She played major roles as a grassroot and nationalist politician in the Eastern Nigerian city of Aba, in the era of an hierarchical and male dominated movement towards independence, with her rise not the least helped by the socialization of women’s role into that of helpmates or appendages to the careers of males. 

Margaret Ekpo’s awareness of growing movements for civil rights for women around the world prodded her into demanding the same for the women in her country and to fight the discriminatory and oppressive political and civil role colonialism played in the subjugation of women. She felt that women abroad including those in Britain, were already fighting for civil rights and had more voice in political and civil matters than their counterparts in Nigeria. She later joined the decolonization leading National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons, as a platform to represent a marginalized group. In 1953, she was nominated by the N.C.N.C. to the regional House of Chiefs and in 1954, she established the Aba Township Women’s Association. As leader of the new market group, she was able to garner the trust of a large amount of women in the township and turn it into a political pressure group. By 1955, women in Aba had outnumbered men voters in a city wide election.

She won a seat into the Eastern Regional House of Assembly in 1961. A position that allowed her to fight for issues affecting women at the time. In particular, were issues on the progress of women in economic and political matters, especially in the areas of transportation around major roads leading to markets and rural transportation in general. 

After a military coup ended the First Republic, she took a less prominent approach to politics. In 2001, the Calabar Airport was named after her.

nigerianostalgia:

Fulbe women with brightly tasseled hat, Zaranda village, east of Jos, Nigeria
Vintage Nigeria